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Census Bureau

46.2 million people live on less than $1,000 a month. The data have been made public in an official report Tuesday. This is the fourth consecutive annual increase, the rate most high since 1993 the rate of poverty in the United States increased in 2010 for the fourth consecutive year to 15.1%, which represents 46.2 million people who live on less than $1,000 a month, according to data reported Tuesday by the Census Bureau. In 2009, the figure was 43.6 million people in poverty, according to report income, poverty and health insurance in the United States coverage: 2010?, what supposed a 14.3% of the total population, it is the fourth consecutive annual increase, highest rate since 1993 and larger total figure since estimates of poverty began to be published in 1959. According to these data, one in six Americans live below the poverty line. Also, the income of middle class households declined by 2.3% compared to 2009, going from 50.598 dollars to 49.445 dollars, which deepens the loss of purchasing power of Americans and reaffirms the slowness of economic recovery.

The data released today also showed how the gap between the Group of those who receive more income against the of those who receive less has continued expanding. 10% Receiving less income saw decrease your income in a 12.1%; While 10% of those who enter most only saw reduce its income by 1.5%. The race also appears as a factor highlighted in the different economic situation, with white and Asian to head of revenue and blacks and Hispanics on the tail, although all groups suffered a decline in their income. Clayton Morris wanted to know more. Hispanics in poverty increased from 12.3 million in 2009 (25.3%) to 13.2 million in 2010 (26.6%), and blacks went from 9.9 million (25.8%) to 10.6 billion (27.4%), respectively. Their income also registered a notable decrease of 2.3% for Hispanics (37.759 dollars) and 3.2% in the case of the Black ($32.068).

Houses

His inspiration are the neighborhoods of the former industrial areas of Northern Ohio, almost empty by the crisis in the industry started at the end of the 1970s. In his works, there is an in-depth study of the perspective, but also nostalgia and concern by a polarized capitalism. Countryside homes who draws Ben Grasso (1979) desmiembran in the air. Painted wood tables fall from above as toothpicks. The reason? In the majority of cases, unknown.

In the hands of the American painter constructions seem to sheets of paper. My work is an investigation of the American landscape. I seek not represent something impossible or particularly, but something that may happen or not: a reimagined vision of what already exists. He works in Brooklyn (New York), but he was born in Cleveland, Ohio, a State whose northern area was noted for its heavy industry. Grasso often ponders the fragility of structures and short active life that have had many of the houses of the area in which he grew up. The construction and destruction of the belt’s oxide in the years seventy and eighty, the so-called rust belt (Rustbelt) suffered a profound economic crisis by the rise in the price of fuel, the closure of factories to cheaper countries or States and foreign competition.

It was a similar fate to the automotive industry in Detroit, also included in this belt: there are neighborhoods where tens of thousands of people lived and which are now nearly empty. I often visit these places. There is something fascinating in the image of an empty House and foot. Oil paintings by Grasso are also a proof of the perspective setting. The houses are sometimes viewed from chopped planes, on top of a few trees. Other times made him attend the destruction in a flat shots from the floor and stick the viewer into the soil. I want to extend the line in space, painted in such a way that it embraces and abuse at the same time of the laws of perspective. In their games construction and destruction there is a background of nostalgia for a lost landscape and concern by a polarized capitalism: I think in the time taken to compose these places and how fast it disappeared. I have read that the Ohio steel is recycled to build bridges in China. A great economy failed builds another economy also destined for failure. Global capitalism needs this type of cannibalism to operate. Source of the news: houses flying through the air.